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Chronic Illness Diabetes

ToyBoxOrphan

Administrator
Joined
Feb 12, 2018
Messages
257
#1
So I know we have at least one other member with diabetes. I was diagnosed with type 2 a few years ago. I take Jardiance and Lantus. I couldn't take Metformin because I got the rare lactic acidosis side effect...something I had to argue with my doctor over. In fact, I argue with doctors pretty much constantly these days. I'm finally getting my numbers under control with the help of a personal trainer. In fact, I'm getting my whole life under control with the help of a personal trainer, but that's really a different thread that will probably be really awkward if I invite him to the forum. :lol:

So, what works for you guys? How much have you adjusted your diet and/or exercise? How do you feel about insulin-dependency?
 
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Messages
72
#2
Well, diabetes sucks. Nothing good about it. I was diagnosed around 28 years ago. I take both long acting and mealtime insulin, as well as metformin and actos. And a handful of other pills for other reasons. I have my numbers pretty well under control (the best in a long time), but it is a constant fight to keep them in line, get enough good sleep with my sleep apnea (I use a cpap machine), deal with GERD and motility issues, and so on. Everything effects everything else.

I fought insulin for a number of years, but I finally gave in years ago and I am glad I did. It really helped me get things under control. Not that I like needles now, but it is tolerable. I have trouble excersizing since I have diabetic foot issues from years ago that makes running verboten and long walks are sometime just not possible. I haven't felt anything in my feet since...I dunno...1995? I don't remember.
 

ToyBoxOrphan

Administrator
Joined
Feb 12, 2018
Messages
257
#3
And a handful of other pills for other reasons. I have my numbers pretty well under control (the best in a long time), but it is a constant fight to keep them in line, get enough good sleep with my sleep apnea (I use a cpap machine), deal with GERD and motility issues, and so on. Everything effects everything else.
It's so connected for me I don't even think diabetes was the beginning of it. I've had a super slow metabolism my whole life. People are amazed to find out I eat breakfast three hours before I go to the gym. When I met Frigg! she sorted me out on some things I can't eat which helped. I can't do margarine or green bell peppers and eggs have to be cage free. My hormones are also a little messed up from growing up near a paper plant which my reproductive endocrinologist figured out immediately when I went in to be treated for endometriosis.

I haven't felt anything in my feet since...I dunno...1995?
This is one of the things that really worries me. How does it start? When doctors ask if you're numb, what counts as numb? Completely numb? Reduced feeling? Is it constant or can it just be sometimes? Like right now, my feet feel completely normal. Sometimes at night though, they feel hotter or colder than they really are and occasionally there's discomfort.
 
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Messages
113
#4
get enough good sleep with my sleep apnea (I use a cpap machine)
These things are life changers. I got one in 2016 and it's amazing not to wake up feeling like a zombie every morning. I still have nights where I wake up a lot but not from the sleep apnea. Also, the wife no longer complains about my snoring so that's a plus.

I'm not diabetic but my mom was diagnosed Type II a few years ago so I should probably keep an eye on those things.
 
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Messages
72
#5
get enough good sleep with my sleep apnea (I use a cpap machine)
These things are life changers. I got one in 2016 and it's amazing not to wake up feeling like a zombie every morning. I still have nights where I wake up a lot but not from the sleep apnea. Also, the wife no longer complains about my snoring so that's a plus.

I'm not diabetic but my mom was diagnosed Type II a few years ago so I should probably keep an eye on those things.
Cpaps rule!
 
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Messages
72
#6
And a handful of other pills for other reasons. I have my numbers pretty well under control (the best in a long time), but it is a constant fight to keep them in line, get enough good sleep with my sleep apnea (I use a cpap machine), deal with GERD and motility issues, and so on. Everything effects everything else.
It's so connected for me I don't even think diabetes was the beginning of it. I've had a super slow metabolism my whole life. People are amazed to find out I eat breakfast three hours before I go to the gym. When I met Frigg! she sorted me out on some things I can't eat which helped. I can't do margarine or green bell peppers and eggs have to be cage free. My hormones are also a little messed up from growing up near a paper plant which my reproductive endocrinologist figured out immediately when I went in to be treated for endometriosis.

I haven't felt anything in my feet since...I dunno...1995?
This is one of the things that really worries me. How does it start? When doctors ask if you're numb, what counts as numb? Completely numb? Reduced feeling? Is it constant or can it just be sometimes? Like right now, my feet feel completely normal. Sometimes at night though, they feel hotter or colder than they really are and occasionally there's discomfort.
It's insidious. It doesn't really start in any way that you will notice; over time you will find that you have less feeling in your toes, for example. Mine actually started with a lot of neuropathy and pain (like pins and needles). Years later, after most of the feeling was gone, I would get (and still occasionally still get) pains like a knife being stuck in the bottom of my foot (this is quite fun when it is my right foot and I'm driving, as pushing the brake pedal seems like it would push the "knife" in further). Just keep your sugars in line, your weight healthy, and excercise as you are able. Check your feet daily. Check your shoes inside and out before putting them on.
 

ToyBoxOrphan

Administrator
Joined
Feb 12, 2018
Messages
257
#7
It's insidious. It doesn't really start in any way that you will notice; over time you will find that you have less feeling in your toes, for example. Mine actually started with a lot of neuropathy and pain (like pins and needles). Years later, after most of the feeling was gone, I would get (and still occasionally still get) pains like a knife being stuck in the bottom of my foot (this is quite fun when it is my right foot and I'm driving, as pushing the brake pedal seems like it would push the "knife" in further). Just keep your sugars in line, your weight healthy, and excercise as you are able. Check your feet daily. Check your shoes inside and out before putting them on.
I have the benefit of being married to a medic so he helps me keep an eye on it.

I've been in terrible shape for years. I'm just now starting to lose weight and get active. I made a vow that when I got to San Antonio, I'd get serious and I've been doing pretty good with that. I've been going to the gym regularly since July. I see a personal trainer twice a week. It costs me a small fortune, but I figure I'm literally buying years of my life back.
 
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